The Any Economy Whatever

In The Any Economy Whatever…’the notion of the [economic] moment that is divorced from the rest of the [market] so its a kind of free floating moment that often links one [bank] to another but when isolated makes no sense and its a moment of kind of pure possibility and freedom from any kind of constraints.’

The Guggenheim currently inspires us with a collaboration of ten artists sharing ‘certain strategies and sensibilities’ focused to transform everyday reality into “theanyspacewhatever“. This exhibit runs through January 7, 2008 (catch it here and on YouTube)

The any space whatever?

“The exhibition’s title, suggested by Gillick, is derived from the writings of the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze, who used the term “any-space-whatever” in “Theory of Cinema”, the notion of the cinematic moment that is divorced from the rest of the narrative so its a kind of free floating moment that often links one scene to another but when isolated makes no sense and its a moment of kind of pure possibility and freedom from any kind of constraints.”

Nancy Spector, Chief Curator, theanyspacewhatever exhibit

The Guggenheim is still one of the best deals around (relative to the Cloisters, $20), regular adult admission at the Guggenheim is $18, every Friday night it’s pay-what-you-wish from 5:45p.m. until the last entry at 7:15 p.m. One day in October it was free.

Just a little of ‘the any economy whatever’ fyi: back in 1981 the Cooper Hewitt tickets were $1.50 for adults and $1.00 for students. In 2008 those tickets go for $15 with weekends free through early January. You can look at this FYI fact in its two dimensions through the CPI Inflation calculator looking glass: In 2008 $15 has the same buying power as $6.42 in 1981; In 1981 $1.50 has the same buying as $3.51 in 2008.

Where would you rather be?

Aren’t you in the same place?
The media tells us that the crash has taken us back in the time machine, yet….
Yes you would rather be in 1981.

This is “the any economy whatever” since I have been around.
July 1953 – May 1954 recession: 10 months
Business Cycle: over Three year
August 1957 – April 1958 recession: 8 months
Business Cycle: Two year
April 1960 – February 1961 recession: 10 months
Business Cycle: over Seven years
December 1969 – November 1970 – recession: 11 months
Business Cycle: Three year
November 1973 to March 1975 recession: 18 months
Business Cycle: under Five year
January 1980 – July 1980 recession: 6 months
Business Cycle: One year
July 1981 – November 1982 recession: 16 months
Business Cycle: under Eight year
July 1990 to March 1991 recession: 8 months
Business Cycle: Ten year
March 2001 – November 2001 recession: 8 months
Faux Business Cycle: Six year
December 2007 to present recession
(faux recession: 8 years and still kicking)

*Info from The National Bureau of Economic Research

NBER: ‘a recession as a period marked by a significant decline in economic activity that is spread across the economy, lasts several months, and is characterized by a downturn in GDP, income, employment, industrial production, and wholesale-retail sales. The U.S. economy cycles through regular intervals of expansion and contraction. Typically, the economy expands for period of six to ten years, followed by a recession that lasts, on average, between six months to two years. Economists refer to the beginning of a recession as its peak and the end as its trough. Once a trough is reached, the economy expands toward another peak. The time between peaks is called a business cycle.’ Hoover Institute

See:

Moody’s Rating a Gift? or a Gift for Moody’s Rating

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